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Billings Estate National Historic Site

Billings Estate National Historic Site

The Billings family settled on the shores of the Rideau River in 1812 and took an active role in shaping the community as it evolved over time and until the 1970s when they left the estate.  This National Historic Site on 8 acres of green space is also home to one of Ottawa’s oldest community cemeteries where well-known Ottawa pioneers, such as the Evans, Brouse and Firth families, are laid to rest.

2100 Cabot Street Ottawa Ontario K1H 6K1 (613) 247-4830 ottawa.ca/en/residents/arts-heritage-and-culture/museums-and-historic-sites/billings-estate-national-historic

Byward Market BIA

Byward Market BIA

Established by Lt-Col. John By in 1826, the ByWard Market is one of Canada’s oldest and largest public markets. Within an area roughly four blocks square, you’ll find museums, cafés, specialty food shops, boutiques, galleries, restaurants, pubs, hair & aesthetics salons and more!

55 Byward Market Square Ottawa Ontario K1N 9C3 (613) 562-3325 byward-market.com

ByWard Market BIA

ByWard Market BIA

The ByWard Market is where Ottawa was born.  Established by Lt-Col. John By in 1826, the ByWard Market is one of Canada’s oldest and largest public markets.  The legendary builder of the Rideau Canal; Lt-Col. By himself laid out the street plan of the Market, designating George and York Streets to be extra wide to accommodate the horse-drawn carriages that brought foodstuffs to the market every day.

The ByWard Market is Ottawa’s number one tourist attraction, and is the premier destination for shopping, dining, arts, entertainment and professional services for residents and visitors. This area averages 50,000 visitors per weekend in the summer months. It is home to both a local farmers’ market and artisans, as well as over 600 independent businesses.

267 Dalhousie Street, #202 Ottawa Ontario K1N7E3 (613) 562-3325 byward-market.com

City of Ottawa Museums

City of Ottawa Museums

Play in the past and make memories for the future at your City of Ottawa’s local museums and historic sites. Enjoy a wide array of themed events, hands-on activities and interactive exhibits.

300 ave des Pères Blancs, 3rd floor Ottawa Ontario K1L 1G3 ottawa.ca/museums

Cumberland Heritage Village Museum

Cumberland Heritage Village Museum

Unique in the nation’s capital, Cumberland Heritage Village Museum provides an immersive, fun, and educational experience that showcases life in the 1920s and 30s with dozens of heritage and true-to-the-era reproduction buildings – including a working sawmill and blacksmith shop– heritage breed farm animals, people in costume, vintage tractor-pulled wagon rides, and so much more.

2940 Old Montreal Road Cumberland Ontario K4C 1G3 (613) 0833-3059 ext. 221 ottawa.ca/en/residents/arts-heritage-and-culture/museums-and-historic-sites/cumberland-heritage-village-museum

Diefenbunker: Canada’s Cold War Museum

Diefenbunker: Canada’s Cold War Museum

The Diefenbunker is a four-story, 100,000 square foot underground bunker, built between 1959 and 1961. The mandate of the Diefenbunker is to increase public interest in and a critical understanding of the Cold War, by preserving the Diefenbunker as a national historic site, and operating a Cold War Museum.

3929 Carp Road Carp Ontario K0A 1L0 (613) 839-0007 diefenbunker.ca

Doors Open Ottawa

Doors Open Ottawa

The City of Ottawa is proud to present Doors Open Ottawa, a free annual architectural event that celebrates our community’s built heritage at the beginning of June.

101 Centrepointe Drive Nepean Ontario K2G 0B5 (613) 580-9674 ottawa.ca/en/residents/arts-heritage-and-culture/museums-and-historic-sites/doors-open-ottawa

Fairbairn House Heritage Centre

Fairbairn House Heritage Centre

One of Wakefield’s oldest dwellings, the Fairbairn house was the home of Scottish settler William Fairbairn. Fairbairn arrived in Wakefield in 1834 and, in 1838, erected the area’s first grist mill, beside the La Pêche River just as it begins its descent to join the Gatineau. The original thick stone walls he constructed are still an attraction in today’s Wakefield Mill. The house, built by William in the 1860s, now sits proudly on the east bank of the Gatineau River, a short walk from the centre of Wakefield village and not far from its original site on William Fairbairn’s farm. It has an adventure-filled past, having been relocated twice. Threatened with demolition in 1993 to make way for a road approach to the new bridge over the Gatineau River, it was moved across Route 105 from its farm location by Andy Tommy. in 2005, about to be torn down to provide space for condo housing, the house was moved again, by the Municipality of La Pêche at the request of the Gatineau Valley Historical Society. Its permanent location is across the river, near the covered bridge, in the seven-acre Hendrick Park. On September 1, 2012, the new Fairbairn House Heritage Centre first opened its doors to visitors. With exhibits, programmes and an ongoing roster of special events, Fairbairn House has a renewed purpose, focussing on our unique history and enhancing the area’s potential as a recreo-touristic destination.

45 Wakefield Heights Wakefield Quebec J0X 3G0 +1.8197783382 www.fairbairn.ca/